LIQUID SOAP ELIMINATES HAND MICROBIAL FLORA

FOAM SOAP IS NOT AS EFFECTIVE AS LIQUID SOAP IN ELIMINATING HAND MICROBIAL FLORA

Reprinted from:

The American Journal of Infection Control
Nicolette Dixon, Margie Morgan, PhD, Ozlem Equils, MD, FAAP

Article Outline
I. Methods
II. Results
III. Conclusions
IV. References

Foam soaps are aerosolized liquid soaps dispensed through a special pump mechanism. Currently there are no studies comparing liquid soap with foam soap in regard to efficacy of reducing hand microbial burden. In 3 separate experiments and with 2 different brands of foam soap, it was observed that nonantimicrobial foam soap was not as effective in reducing hand bacterial load as the liquid soap.

Hand hygiene has been shown to prevent the spread of infectious microorganisms, including those that are resistant to antimicrobial agents, in multiple settings, including hospitals.1 There have been multiple studies on the effectiveness of various types of cleansers, including plain soap, alcohol-based handrubs, and antibacterial soaps.2 There have been concerns over antibacterial soaps and emergence of resistant bacteria,3 and the US Food and Drug Administration has recently issued a final rule that banned over-the-counter consumer antiseptic wash products containing triclosan and triclocarban to be marketed.

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Interview with Louis Rios

When we were photographing the “Before, During and After” pictures showing how well Active Force MP cleans hands, we used a local man with hard working hands. We covered his hands with carbon black, oil and grime from a car. During the washing off process, he kept saying, “Wow, I can’t believe this. Wow! Wow!” So, I asked him what he was experiencing.

Q.  Louis, why were you saying “Wow!” so much?

A. When you put all of that dirt and grime on me, I didn’t think it would be easy to get off. I have used other hand cleaners over the years, and I thought this dirt would be a chore to remove.

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Occupational Skin Diseases

The skin forms the barrier between a person and their environment. It protects the body from harmful environmental effects, but is exposed to those same potential risks. Especially in industry, the skin has to resist many potential hazards. If the skin is not sufficiently protected, skin damage and disease may occur.

A third of all confirmed occupational diseases in industry affect the skin. In 2010 alone, over 23,500 new cases of dermatitis occurred. Experts assume that the actual number might be 50 to 100 times higher.

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